Browsing Tag

Terry Gilliam

The Double (2013)

Double may only be Richard Ayoade’s second directorial credit, but it is likely his most artistic offering yet. This brief whirlwind of affairs, adapted from the Dostoyevsky novella of the same name, follows the increasing misfortune that…

The Zero Theorem (2014)

It should be a requirement that in all screenings of Terry Gilliam's movies, the film in question should be shown two or three times in succession. Brazil, Twelve Monkeys, and now The Zero Theorem: all beg an immediate re-watch to try and…

The Double (2014)

The Double is horror for the meek, comedy for the rest of the world. A loose adaptation of the Dostoyevsky novel of the same name, Ayoade's second feature as a director spans genres and spins laughs out of our deepest-held terrors that our…

Brazil (1985)

I can't remember who it was, it may have been director Terry Gilliam himself or it may have been written in a review I read a long time ago, but I always remember someone describing Brazil as "the best adaptation of 1984 that isn't called…

The Zero Theorem (2013)

Director Terry Gilliam brings us another visual feast set in the future and thankfully goes back to his roots. Featuring a multitude of great actors, The Zero Theorem has the fantastic Christoph Waltz at its centre as eccentric recluse…

The 70th Venice Int. Film Festival

As always, the oldest film festival in the world, is set on the luxurious Lido in Venice and as the final touches were being put to the beautiful venues and, more importantly, the red carpet today, the sun shone and the sea sparkled,…

A Liar’s Autobiography (2012)

Questions abound about this film, an animated dramatisation of a long-forgotten memoir of a long-time dead comedian. Some are of the existential kind. Such as, why now, some twenty-three years and two months since its subject died? Or…

For No Good Reason (2012)

It would be difficult to make a dull documentary about Ralph Steadman, his life being so intrinsically interesting and his body of work so challenging and fascinating, but you need have no fear of that flaw in Charlie Paul's mesmerising…